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  • Collection > Veterans History Project (remove)
  • Subject > Video recordings (remove)
  • Subject > Michigan--History, Military (remove)
  • Subject > Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Personal narratives, American (remove)

27 results

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  • Text: camp and listen to music, I‟d listen to music and go to the NCO club. 45:00 22 Interviewer: One of the sort of standard critiques, largely cliché, about the soldiers in Vietnam, and so forth, is they were drinking, doing drugs and doing all sorts
Brinn, Joseph (Interview transcript and video), 2010
Joe Lange was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on October 9th, 1947. After graduating high school, Lange married and briefly attended college before getting a full-time job and receiving his draft notice. After receiving his draft noticed, Lange went through basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky and advanced training at Fort Belvoir, Virginia to be a generator mechanic. Once he completed the training at Fort Belvoir, Lange returned home before deploying to Vietnam to serve for a year in the 124th Signal Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division.
Lange, Joesph (Interview transcript and video), 2011

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  • Text: that with that? Straighten up a little bit. Comb that hair.‟” (00:34:33) “What kind of music were you listening to?” (00:34:35) ”Pretty much what anyone else was listening to.” (00:34:41) “Okay. This is like the rock-n-roll era.” (00:34:44) “Credence Clearwater Revival, any
Sefton, Mary B. (Interview transcript and video), 2005

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  • Text: and the media portrayed the war in a negative light almost every night and demonstrations at colleges and universities began to increase (00:41:50:00) o When Martin Luther King Jr. was shot, the Army played very soft music for three days because
Groothuis, Larry (Interview outline and video), 2011

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  • Text: in Vietnam”, but now it’s being played on popular music, so there are a lot of things you miss. 49:02 Yeah, there is a lot that I missed, obviously. Interviewer: Now, there are stereotype images of Vietnam and what went on in Vietnam and a certain kind
Hardiman, Bill (Interview transcript and video), 2011

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  • Text: Jersey for AIT, which they called Advanced Individual Training, but it‘s Advanced Infantry Training, I mean that‘s all Dix was, and so, I‘m still with all these guys from down south. 19:03 I don‘t like sweet tea and banjo music, and I wasn‘t a country fan
Whipple, Bruce (Interview transcript and video), 2011

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  • Text: the elephants paid them little attention (00:42:51:00) The enemy was very laid back; they played music, sang, had campfires going and were cooking food (00:43:00:00) o Some units moved very quickly and expediently and they ate on the move and other units
Hodges, Jim (Interview outline and video), 2010
Les Dykema was born in 1949 and few up in Hudsonville, Michigan. He tried college, but did not do well in his first year and in 1968 went ahead and enlisted in the Army and get some choice of assignment rather than wait to be drafted. In basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, he found that he did not much like the Army, and got into some trouble, but made it through and went on to Fort Gordon, Georgia, for military police training. Despite a few more run-ins with authority, he completed the training and spent several months there working at a recreation area on the base before going to Vietnam in 1969. He was assigned to an MP unit, and soon got into trouble with his sergeant and captain, and was eventually reassigned to a combat engineer unit in the field. He worked with a demolition squad for some time, including the period of the Cambodian incursion in 1970, before being wounded and sent to Japan to recuperate. He agreed to extend his Vietnam tour in exchange for a month at home and
Dykema, Leslie (Interview transcript and video), 2011
Paul Ceton was born in 1946 in Muskegon, Michigan, and was drafted in 1966. Following a year of training at Fort Hood in Texas, Ceton deployed to Vietnam as part of the 198th Infantry Brigade of the Americal Division. Ceton fought in Vietnam for three months and while stationed on the Van Truong Peninsula, he received head wounds during a firefight and lost his right eye. After spending time in hospitals in Japan and Illinois, Ceton spent a brief period at Fort Sheridan before receiving his discharge in July 1968, after which he moved back to Michigan. In the 1990s, he made two return trips to Vietnam.
Ceton, Paul (Interview transcript and video), 2010

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  • Text: that played music, you know, a radio station on the bus and just as we‘re getting in, driving into Knox, that‘s what they played. 17:04 I said, ―This is some kind of a thing telling me, ―you shouldn‘t be here‖‖, but as soon as that bus hit, the training
Raudenbush, Michael (Interview transcript and video), 2011

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  • Text: you tell us where and when you were born? I was born in 1946 in Gary, Indiana. Interviewer: What did your family do for a living in those days? My father and mother were both teachers in, especially in the music area. Interviewer: Did you grow up
Dorsey, Richard (Interview transcript and video), 2010
Jeffrey Wilcox was born in New York and moved to Gary, Indiana as a youth. After high school, he attended West Point, and graduated in 1968. He was then assigned to an Army unit that was stationed in Berlin. He stayed there for a year, and was then shipped off to Vietnam. He joined the 101st Airborne Division, and operated for some time in the Ripcord Fire Support base. There, he frequently encountered the enemy, getting a minor wound in the process. After Vietnam, he spent a year and a half in the Transport Corps in Washington DC. After his time in the service, he worked for various different veterans support and advocacy groups on the west coast.
Wilcox, Jeffrey (Interview transcript and video), 2008